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Heading Home

It's been a good trip

sunny 35 °C

March 1, 2015

Our trip can be divided into three parts; on our own in San Jose, with the group tour and finally in Coco-Peninsula de Nicoya and each was very different. Being on our own in a large metro area in a new country is always a test of ones ability to handle change and the unexpected. Living daily and close up with a group of strangers for two weeks is always a bit of a crapshoot. Some groups jell and others don’t mix well. It’s usually pretty easy to stay in an up scale resort and pamper oneself for the last week of a trip.

Start of the trip home…... Another clear blue sky, slight breeze, lots of mourning doves, 28C. Take an expensive van/taxi ride to the airport in Liberia. Flight time is pushed back an hour. This keeps happening. Airport wifi access isn’t free either and being cheap we will wait until we get to our hotel in San Jose to log on again.

It’s at least cool with a/c going plus it allows us some time to think about our month in Costa Rica. What to say…….

We really enjoyed our time here. Costa Rica is a micro-continent unto itself. There are 12 distinct ecological zones which are home to an astonishing array of flora and fauna, approximately 5% of all know species on earth. We trekked thru dense rainforests, dry deciduous forests, open savannah, lush wetlands including mangrove estuaries, montane cloud forests, volcanic skree, and tropical beaches, etc.

Oh, flight’s on schedule after all. The hot strong wind makes it hard to walk to the plane. We take the 12 seater, single prop plane again back to San Jose. When we got on there was a family on it who had got on in San Jose and were heading to a place called Tamirindo. The 10 year old boy had already thrown up in the barf bag, the dad had spilled his water bottle in his pack when he was trying to get the gravol out, the mom told us to be sure to put our shoulder straps on. The pilot/flight attendant checked to make sure we did. Said it would be a bit bumpy. 45 minutes later a cow watched us land and we dropped them off. The 12 year old wished us luck. A local got on and crossed herself, can’t help but wonder if she knows something we don’t. The 45 minute flight to San Jose was a bit bumpy but not too bad at all. Now we're sitting at the Hampton Inn near the airport waiting to go to the airport tomorrow a.m. We should get back around midnight tomorrow.

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It’s been a good trip. Not quite what either of us expected. We’ve been close up to many interesting wildlife: bright, colourful birds, crowds of hummingbirds, 3 kinds of Toucans, herons, egrets, and tiny bats… Then colourful and large butterflies, sloths, 3 kinds of monkeys, coatamundi’s, raccoons, agouti’s and peccaries. Oh and alligators and caimans, snakes and tarantulas!

Then there’s been the scenery…rivers through the jungle, sunrise canoe trip through an estuary (with caiman), volcanoes, bubbling mud, wet jungle, dry jungle, coffee, banana, pineapple plantations…

And the adventures: hanging bridges 60 metres high, zip-lining almost a mile across a valley, white water rafting, walking on white sands and swimming in 30c water, jumping into waterfalls.

The highlight for Gail was the homestay with the family on the farm. Our mutual language skills were limited but the family was warm and welcoming. We felt privileged to be able to spend the night with them. Fred most memorable was event was the Tarzan jump on the zip line, his heart is beating fast.

What we have seen in Costa Rica is a country full of contrasts. Rain, lots of it in the central area and desert on the Pacific coast. People who work 7 days a week, 10 hours a day attempting to get ahead and are very devoted to their families. Almost 70 years ago they disbanded their army to provide health care and education to their children. A country that believes that protecting their natural resources should be a high priority and struggles with getting much of its income from crops by multinational firms that are grown in a non-sustainable manner. Lots of razor-wire but people who have invited us into their homes, have been extremely helpful and friendly, who love their country. .

We are glad that we came to Costa Rica.

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Posted by Colenso 19:22 Archived in Costa Rica

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Gracias!!

by Deborah

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